Make your Home a Calming and Restorative space

Make your Home a Calming and Restorative space

We are all familiar with that feeling of serenity and peace when we get away from it all and find ourselves surrounded by nature and life’s simple pleasures. The good news is that there is a way to extend this feel good factor into our homes too! Incorporating direct or indirect elements of nature into our living spaces has been demonstrated to: reduce stress, blood pressure levels and heart rates, whilst increasing productivity, creativity and self reported rates of well-being.

Here are some easy ways to implement design principles that will help transform your home into a haven of well-being:

 

  1. Improve air quality by reducing toxins!                                                         

The first easy step is to make sure that you are allowing for natural ventilation, so throw open your windows as often as possible! The simple house plant is also a great way to improve your air quality and reduce household toxins from cleaning products, synthetic furnishings and even your carpet. In 1989, NASA discovered that houseplants can absorb harmful toxins from the air, especially in enclosed spaces with little air flow.

                            

restorative and calm interiors

  1. Improve natural and artificial lighting

We need as much exposure to natural light during the day as possible. In the evening, make sure you keep your lighting low and use warm rather than cold lighting to make your spaces relaxing and get you ready for sleep.

 

collectiviste lighting giant moon light

 

  1. Focus on internal and external views onto nature

Again, house plants are great for this. We love succulents as well as they take up minimum space and you can dot them around everywhere. They are also very easy to care for. Also, optimise any views that you have onto your garden or trees. You could always pop some plants outside your window too if you are in a built up urban area.

  1. Use of natural materials textures, patterns and colours

Tactile furnishings awaken the senses! Tropical and floral patterns on accessories such as cushions, throws, rugs or even statement wall paper are also great for this. The choice of natural materials for your furniture and decor items like wood or stone will also work well.

 

Using natural materials in your home decoration


The official term for incorporating natural design principles to improve health and well being is biophilic design. It is a fascinating idea and you can discover a wealth of information 

here: https://www.terrapinbrightgreen.com/reports/14-patterns/#the-patterns

 

By Nicole Da Prato






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